Raleigh Nature

September 25, 2008

Fallon Park – a long, fine necklace in Raleigh’s greenway jewels

 Fallon Park, just northeast of Five Points, and sloping with its long narrow shape down to Crabtree Creek at Anderson Drive, is a long necklace in Raleigh’s park jewels. The remains of a small mill structure lend even more interest to a wonderful rockfall along the creek that defines the park.  Fallon Creek is short : its headwaters gather right in the front yards of the very well appointed houses along White Oak Road off Anderson Drive.  The long skinny park has an unpaved path that is heavily used by joggers, walkers and doggers.  I never go on the weekend, but I have such fond memories of going there on weekday afternoons with my small children, chasing crawfish in the rockpools and climbing around the old mill structure.  It is a clean, rock-filled creek with a wide range of trees and plants arranged around its slopes.  There are small grass meadows at the top and bottom.  It serves a surrounding community that maintains rich, semi-organic plantings in its large yards, and it drains steep wooded slopes with older houses and little construction.  The creek’s quality reflects all of that.

Rockpools where Lily and Dori and I fished many times.

Rockfall and brick mill structure.

Fallon Park photo tour

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I posted at Raleigh Rambles about the Carolina Farm Stewardship’s  farm tour.  It was a fun couple of drives, and we saw plenty of nature to go along with the agriculture, as pictured below.

Above, a native plant area at the Piedmont Biofuel Lab Farm.  Below a large bird, perhaps a raven , that swooped down toward the highway for some time in front of us.  I suppose it’s probably a vulture, but it certainly didn’t act like one.

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5 Comments »

  1. These are some great pictures you’ve taken!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Comment by natalie Razzeto — December 11, 2008 @ 11:02 pm

  2. I studied birds of prey for a few years, including identification from the air. The bird is hard to identify from this picture, particularly given its seemingly streamlined shape. However, I will commend you on your photography–the shot is very artistic!

    Also, if it was alone, it’s more likely to be a hawk. Cliche as it sounds, vultures travel in groups. Seeing one alone, while possible, isn’t a typical experience.

    Nice blog! Enjoyed my visit.

    Cass L.

    p.s. hey, mr. DJ? Five points. 😉

    Comment by Cass Lewandowski — December 11, 2008 @ 11:04 pm

  3. it looks like it is paradise. There are still a lot of hidden treasures in this world

    Comment by feliz — May 11, 2010 @ 3:32 pm

  4. […] that would be very quiet at night and offer places to sit and contemplate: Edna Metz Wells Park Fallon Park Local park between E. Park and W. Park in Raleigh I can't speak for the safety of any of these at […]

    Pingback by where to go really late at night - The Triangle Area - Page 2 - City-Data Forum — July 23, 2011 @ 12:26 am

  5. Hi,

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    Either way, thanks for all the hard work and I’ll be sure to keep visiting your website. Have a great week!

    Sincerely,
    Max Wood

    Comment by Max Wood — November 3, 2011 @ 6:07 am


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